Pages

20 April, 2011

Chapters in Books

  • "Chaucer Among the Victorians." In: Oxford Handbook of Victorian Medievalism, ed. Joanna Parker. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2017. [forthcoming]
  • "The Return to Medievalism and the Future of Medieval Studies." In: Anglistentag 2016. Proceedings, ed. Ute Berns (Trier: WVT, 2017). 137-47.
  • "The Cathedral as Time Machine: Art, Architecture, and Religion." In: The Idea of the Gothic Cathedral. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Meanings of the Medieval Edifice in the Modern Period, ed. Stephanie Glaser (Turnhout: Brepols, 2017). 239-59. 
  • "Beyond Sherwood: Robin Hood’s Global Appeal." In: Alte Helden – Neue Zeiten. Ed. A. Schindler. Würzburg: Köngshausen & Neumann, 2017. 13-25.
  • "Academic Medievalism and Nationalism." In: The Cambridge Companion to Medievalism, ed. L. D'Arcens. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2016. 119-134.
  • "Making Medievalism: A Critical Overview." In: Medievalism: Key Critical Terms, ed. E. Emery & R. Utz. Cambridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2014. 1-10 [with E. Emery].
  • "Past, Present, and Neo." In: Humanistic Perspectives in a Technological World, ed. R. Utz. Atlanta: Georgia Inst. of Technology, 2014. 139-40. [prepub. version]
  • "Come Join Us in the Cloud." In: Humanistic Perspectives in a Technological World, ed. R. Utz. Atlanta: Georgia Inst. of Technology, 2014. 15-17.
  • "Robin Hood, Frenched," in: Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture, ed. by Gail Ashton and Daniel T. Kline. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. 145-58. Abstract: Between 1963 and 1966, French Television broadcast a medievalist series entitled Thierry La Fronde, or Thierry the Sling. This successful series, which was also shown in Canada, Poland (Thierry Śmiałek), Australia (The King's Outlaw), and the Netherlands (Thierry de Slingeraar), transposes the English Robin Hood narrative into late medieval France in fascinating ways. Drawing from the postmedieval English tradition surrounding Robin Hood, in which the protagonist appears as a member of the nobility who has fallen from grace, Thierry de Janville, a young Sologne nobleman, who had fought against the English occupation by the French during the Hundred Years War, loses his title and lands because of his disloyal steward. Taking up the name "Thierry La Fronde" and surrounding himself with a host or merry men (and Isabelle, his "Maid Marian"), he wields his knightly sword as well as the popular sling in his résistance against the oppressive Black Prince and his allies. My analysis of the series addressed the feuilleton's indebtedness to numerous elements of the Robin Hood narrative, characters, and episodes, specifically those in The Adventures of Robin Hood and Ivanhoe, two TV shows targeting Anglo-American audiences in the 1950s. I also pointed out how the series presents an excellent reservoir for investigating common 1960s conceptions about medieval history, literature, and culture.
  • "A Moveable Feast: Repositionings of 'The Medieval' in Medieval Studies, Medievalism, and Neomedievalism." In: Neomedievalism in the Media: Essays on Film, Television, and Electronic Games. Ed. Carol L. Robinson & Pamela Clements. Lewiston: Mellen, 2012. "This collection, edited by Carol Robinson and Pamela Clements, is bookended by the brief attempts of Richard Utz and Terry Jones to contextualize an increasingly popular neologism. Utz situates neomedievalism squarely within Jean Baudrillard'€™s procession of simulacra in its 'creat(ion) of pseudo-medieval worlds that playfully obliterate history' with a simulacra of the medieval, employing images that are neither an original nor the copy of an original, but altogether 'Neo'" (v). The sly evocation of the Wachowski brothers'€™ films works on a number of levels. To undertake such analyses one needs to spend long hours within the matrix, but still be willing to unplug, to have one’s suspension of disbelief suspended. Utz'€™s pun also hints at the strange companionship of science fiction and medievalism, which, though it has a very long history, seems especially intense in recent popular media." Nickolas Haydock, Arthuriana 23/2 (2013), 77-80 (77).
  • Englische Philologie vs. English Studies: A Foundational Conflict.” In: Das Potential europäischer Philologien. Geschichte, Leistung, Funktion. Ed. Christoph König. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2009. 34-44. 
  • “Clemen Among the Chaucerians: Towards a Reception History of Der junge Chaucer.” In: Clemen im Kontext. Ein Beitrag zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte vor und nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg. Ed. Ina Schabert. Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, 2009). 71-80. "In einem Beitrag zur Dissertation Clemens über die Bildersprache Shakespeares in ihrem deutschen Original im Vergleich zur englischen Neufassung kann Bettina Boecker überzeugend zeigen, wie stark sich Clemens Buch schon auf der stilistischen Ebene verändert hat und die eindeutig romantisch geprägte Darstellung in der Transformation ins Englische deutlich zurückgenommen wird und die Metaphorik weniger emphatisch wirkt. Auch seine Habilitationsschrift über das Frühwerk Chaucers, die bei ihrem Erscheinen 1938 positiv aufgenommen wurde und die Richard Utz genauer unter die Lupe nimmt, hat Clemen revidiert und überarbeitet - sein Werk, so Utz, habe ihm einen Platz im Walhalla der grundlegenden Studien zu Chaucer gesichert." Till Kinzel, Informationsmittel (IFB): Digitales Rezensionsorgan für Bibliothek und Wissenschaft]. "Clemens Interesse an Chaucers früher Dichtung im Gefolge der Habilitationsschrift von 1938 und ihrer internationale[n] Rezeption wird von Richard Utz im Kontext der Forschungsentwicklung von der Vorkriegszeit bis zum Erscheinen der englischen Übersetzung Chaucer's Early Poetry (1963) sachkundig und mit verständnisvoller Objektivität charakterisiert." Christa Jansohn, Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen (2010)
  • “Writing Alternative Worlds: Rituals of Authorship in Late Medieval Theological and Literary Discourse.” In: Creations: Medieval Rituals, the Arts, and the Concept of Creation. Ed. Nils Holger Petersen, et al. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. 121-38. "Referring to the ‘rituals’ of literature in a more metaphorical sense, Richard Utz's ‘Writing Alternative Worlds: Rituals of Authorship and Authority in Late Medieval Theological and Literary Discourse’ corrects a widespread view about medieval authors as anonymous or self-effacing instances, and makes clear that fourteenth-century literature [...] deliberately ‘experiments with a variety of authorship roles’. That Foucault’s ‘author-function’ emerged in the late Middle Ages can be seen from Chaucer’s triple authorial (‘creator-like’) roles of narrator, impersonator of the divine spirit, and servant of the work’s audience." Pieter Mannaerts, Music & Letters (2009). Richard Utz also takes up Henryson's poem in relation to Chaucer's [...]. Utz argues that Henryson sees his poem as a Christian corrective to the secular attitudes towards courtly love and its repercussions that Chaucer puts forth in his poem. Jennifer Brown, Juris Lidaka, et al., Year's Work in English Studies 88.1 (2009). Contrast the nominalism-informed perspective of Richard Utz, who challenges the legitimacy of Foucault's sweeping claim that medieval authors were anonymous, and argues for a medieval sense of authorial sophistication in ‘Writing Alternative Worlds: Rituals of Authorship and Authority in Late Medieval Theological and Literary Discourse’ [...]. Utz's test cases are Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, Henryson's Testament of Cresseid, and John Metham's Amoryus and Cleopes, and his driving idea the nominalist concept of potentia absoluta in so far as it relates to the providential designs of God and poet. The ending of Troilus and Criseyde shows Chaucer experimenting with an authorial role that explicitly parallels that of the divine creator. Valerie Allen and Margaret Connolly, The Year's Work in English Studies 88.1 (2009). Richard Utz's essay about alternative worlds in medieval literary discourse has a very interesting philosophical perspective. He focuses his attention mainly on Chaucer's work entitled Troilus and Criseyde. Utz proposes to read this Chaucer work as the reproduction by the author of God's potentia absoluta, that is the simultaneous presence of alternatives which are only under the author's control. Utz, following other scholars, shows the influence that the Nominalist school had on Chaucer's works, although the view according to which a thinker who exalts God's omnipotence (potentia absoluta) has to be qualified as "nominalist" rather that "realist" or "hyper realist," it is not commonly accepted. For example one could take a look at Luca Parisoli's books on John Duns Scotus--who was probably the most important defender of God's omnipotence--(La Philosophie Normative de Jean Duns Scot, Istituto Storico dei Cappuccini, Roma 2001, La Contraddizione Vera, Istituto Storico dei Cappuccini, 2005). Antonella Doninelli Parisoli, The Medieval Review (2009).
  • "A Bibliography of Medieval Latin Dictamen." In: Letter-Writing Manuals and Instruction from Antiquity to the Present. Ed. Carol Poster and Linda Mitchell. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2007. 285-300. (with Carol Poster) "The volume [Letter-Writing Manuals and Instruction from Antiquity to the Present] closes with seven excellent Appendices (numbered A to G), pp. 245-335: bibliographies of ancient letter writing collections and epistolary theory (Suzanne Abram), medieval Latin dictamen (Carol Poster and Richard Utz), dictamen in England 1500-1700 (Lawrence D. Green), critical studies on Renaissance dictamen [...]." Iona Costa, Bryn Mawr Classical Review (2008)].
  • “Eminent Chaucerians? Continuity and Transformation in German-Speaking Chaucer Philology, 1918-1948.” In: Anglistik: Research Paradigms and Institutional Policies, 1930-2000. Ed. Stephan Kohl. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2005. 25-43.
  • “Philosophy.” In: Chaucer: An Oxford Guide. Ed. Steve Ellis. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2005. 158-73. "Setting aside for the moment Barry Windeatt’s observation as to ‘the condescension of claiming Chaucer as some harbinger of postmodernism,’ the Guide speaks as an authoritative text, providing direction and knowledge generally well adapted to its intended undergraduate audience, both British and American. Some essays, Elizabeth Robertson’s fine survey of twentieth-century criticism comes to mind, will be repeatedly useful as will Kevin J. Harty’s survey of Chaucer in performance, Peter Brown’s essay on Chaucer’s guides, Richard Utz’s on philosophy, Jim Rhodes’s on religion, and S.H. Rigby’s ‘Society and Politics.’ Not so others—the curious excursion in Marion Turner’s essay, ‘Who can forget, for example, the Iraqi dethronement of Baghdad’s giant statue of Saddam Hussein in April?’ for instance, signals its short shelf life." Richard H. Osberg, Arthuriana 16.1 (2006).
  • “Remembering Ritual Murder: The Blood Accusation in Medieval and Contemporary Cultural Memory.” In: Genre and Ritual: The Cultural Heritage of Medieval Rituals. Ed. Eyolf Østrem, et al. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2005. 145-62. "This volume contains some genuinely interesting and detailed studies [...]. Richard Utz’s 'Remembering Ritual Murder: The Anti-Semitic Blood Accusation Narrative in Medieval and Contemporary Cultural Memory' cleverly links the medieval tale of Hugh of Lincoln with the 2002 death of Jewish journalist Daniel Pearl, among other later historical incidents." Carol M. Cusack, Journal of Religious History (2007)
  • “Das Zwillingspaar aus Chatwinshire: Bruce Chatwins antibinäre Utopie.” In: Paare und Paarungen. Festschrift für Werner Wunderlich. Ed. Ulrich Müller et al. Stuttgart: Heinz, 2004. 343-53.
  • “Gender and Time in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.” In: Homo Narrans. Texts and Essays in Honor of Jerome Klinkowitz. Ed. Zygmunt Mazur and R. Utz. Crácow: Jagiellonian UP, 2004. 193-206.
  • "Reflecting Love at Quite Its Natural Size: Doris Dörrie as a Writer." In: Straight Through the Heart: Doris Dörrie, German Filmmaker and Author, ed. Franz Birgel, Klaus Phillips and Christian-Albrecht Gollub. Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 2004. 177-87.
  • “Translationes Imperii:  Swan Songs, Adaptations, and New Beginnings in Third-Reich Chaucer Philology.” Anglistentag 2001 Wien, Proceedings. Ed. Dieter Kastovsky, et al. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 2002. 253-63.
  • “Editing Chaucer: John Koch and the Forgotten Tradition.” In: ‘And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche.’ Papers on Language and Literature in Honour of Prof. Dr. Karl Heinz Göller. Ed. Wladislaw Witalisz. Crácow: Jagiellonian UP, 2001. 17-26.
  • “Medievalism in the Modern World: Introductory Perspectives.” (with Tom Shippey). In: Medievalism in the Modern World: Essays in Honour of Leslie Workman. Ed. R. Utz and Tom Shippey. Making the Middle Ages, 1. Turnhout: Brepols, 1998. 1-13.
  • “‘Cleansing’ the Discipline: Ernst Robert Curtius and His Medievalist Turn.” In: Medievalism in the Modern World: Essays in Honour of Leslie Workman. Ed. R. Utz and Tom Shippey. Making the Middle Ages, 1. Turnhout: Brepols, 1998. 359-78. "[T]he personal passions, idiosyncracies, and indeed shortcomings of Great Scholars, and their potential to shape disciplines, has been famously thematised by Norman Cantor in Inventing the Middle Ages. This theme is taken up in Richard Utz' ""Cleansing" the Discipline: Ernst Robert Curtius and his Medievalist Turn". Here Utz focuses on Curtius' thoroughgoing demolition of his fellow-medievalist Hans Hermann Glunz, and the devastating outcome of this for Glunz. This Cantoresque essay provides a fascinating alternative portrait of a scholar whose anti-nationalist reputation, Utz suggests, sits uncomfortably alongside a more questionable ethic of scholarly ambition and intellectual dogmatism. By considering the human expense at which Curtius' stature was achieved, the essay also offers a counter-history of medieval studies, one which ultimately makes a case for the importance of intellectual generosity and plurality within a discipline." Louise D'Arcens, Prolepsis (2000)
  • “Speaking of Medievalism: An Interview with Leslie J. Workman. In: Medievalism in the Modern World: Essays in Honour of Leslie Workman. Ed. R. Utz and Tom Shippey. Making the Middle Ages, 1. Turnhout: Brepols, 1998. 433-49. "The concluding interview between Workman and Richard Utz reminds us that while we can to some extent attribute scholarly developments to intellectual or cultural paradigm shifts, we should never discount the force of individual imagination and tenacity. Workman's account in this interview of his own singular intellectual path from childhood to the present also demonstrates - most appositely, given the often deeply personal nature of medievalism - the equal importance of the public and private self in the forging of a scholarly passion." Louise D'Arcens, Prolepsis (2000)
  •  “Resistance to (The New) Medievalism? Comparative Deliberations on (National) Philology, Mediävalismus, and Mittelalter-Rezeption in Germany and North America.” The Future of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance: Problems, Trends, and Opportunities in Research. Ed. Roger Dahood. Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, 2. Turnhout: Brepols, 1998. 151-70.
  • “A Panel Discussion among Leslie J. Workman, T.A. Shippey, Allen J. Frantzen, Paul E. Szarmach, Richard J. Utz, and Arthur F. Kinney.” In: The Future of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance: Problems, Trends, and Opportunities in Research. Ed. Roger Dahood. Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, 2. Turnhout: Brepols, 1998. 3-18 (9-13).
  • “‘As writ myn auctour called Lollius’: Divine and Authorial Omnipotence in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde.” In: Nominalism and Literary Discourse: New Perspectives. Ed. Hugo Keiper, R. Utz, and Christoph Bode. Critical Studies, 10. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1997. 123-44. "Richard Utz is perhaps the foremost exponent of the "paradigm" of Nominalist influence upon late Medieval English literature. His own book and the collection of essays which he edited in 1995, are among the leading causes of the revival of interest by literary scholars in the influence of Nominalism. [Utz, in “‘As Writ Myn Auctor Called Lollius’: Divine and Authorial Omnipotence in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde,”] uses the old scholarly debate over the identity of “Lollius” to push forward the argument [...] that Nominalism freed Chaucer from analogy, from a dependence upon strict allegory. [...] Never pressing his case beyond what can be convincingly demonstrated, Utz gives us a model of a nuanced and convincing affirmation of Nominalist influence on Chaucer." Grover Furr, The Medieval Review (1999)
  • “Literary Criticism and the Nation: The Nationalpsychologische Methode in German Anglistics. 1928-1955.” In: Moeurs et images, études d'imagologie européenne. Ed. Alain Montandon. Clermont-Ferrand: Centre de Recherches sur les Littératures Modernes et Contemporaines, 1997. 121-2
  • “Hugh von Lincoln und der Mythos vom jüdischen Ritualmord.” In: Herrscher-Helden-Heilige. Ed. Werner Wunderlich and Ulrich Müller. Konstanz: Universitätsverlag, 1996. 681-92.
  • “Reading/Teaching against the Grain: Literariness and Tarzan of the Apes in the Literature Classroom.” In: Investigating the Unliterary: Six Essays on Burrough's Tarzan of the Apes. Ed. R. Utz. Regensburg: Martzinek: 1995. 1-13.
  • “Negotiating the Paradigm: Literary Nominalism and the Theory and Practice of Re-Reading Late Medieval Texts.” In: Literary Nominalism and the Theory of Rereading Late Medieval Texts: A New Research Paradigm. Ed. R. Utz. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen, 1995. 1-30.
  • “Lexicography and Gender-Neutrality: Example Phrases and Sentences in Three Modern Dictionaries of English.” In: Language and Civilization: A Concerted Profusion of Essays and Studies in Honor of Otto Hietsch. Ed. Claudia Blank. Frankfurt-on-Main: Peter Lang, 1992. Vol. 2: 262-77.